Kinship Circle
Share/Bookmark
SEARCH
Email List
spacerAction Alerts  ❘   Email List  ❘   Education Resources  ❘   Updates & Victories  ❘   News  ❘   About Us  ❘   Store  ❘   Home spacerDisaster Aid Home  ❘   Disaster Watch  ❘   Donate  ❘   Volunteer  ❘  Columns & Words  ❘   Videos  ❘   Inspirational Heartbeats



"We create false data which, combined with the differences among species, make our efforts to apply the results to man, useless."
Behaviorist psychologist Dr. Roger E. Ulrich
spacer
ALL  ■  RESEARCH  ■  FOOD  ■  COMPANION  ■  ENTERTAIN  ■  FASHION  ■  WILD  ■  DISASTER  ■  ADVOCACY  ■  POEMS spacer You Paid For It: Animal Testing

by Brenda Shoss

At the University of California, Davis, Dr. Kenneth Britten annually receives $220,000 to anchor restraining devices to the heads of rhesus monkeys and graft coils into their eyes. In 2001, Emory University acquired about $118,185,010 for researchers such as Garret Alexander to route electrodes into the brains of macaque monkeys. Restrained, fluid-deprived monkeys do behavioral drills to earn juice. Later, they’re embalmed alive.

Dr. Madeleine Schlag-Rey of UCLA and Dr. Richard Andersen of California Institute of Technology also install devices into primates’ brains. Since 1985 Dr. William Newsome has steadily repeated Dr. Britten’s primate tests, in one of many labs that earned Stanford University around $107,272,736 in 2001 alone. At Yale University Charles Bruce has collected a near $3.4 million in endowments to perform remarkably similar primate tests.

Who pays for these duplicative projects?
In the U.S., National Institutes of Health (NIH) assigns taxpayer dollars to biomedical research — most often funding investigator-initiated grants that back the experimenter and the institution. Some 30-70% of the NIH budget goes to animal-mode research (opposingviews.com/i/money-in-animal-based-research). Each year, universities receive millions that help pay utility bills and other overhead. One U.S. Representative noted that the medical establishment now seeks NIH grants for the money alone, not necessarily for scientific research.

Indeed, quick money comes from animal studies, not clinical or in vitro research. "NIH under-funds patient-oriented research," (Committee on Addressing Career Paths for Clinical Research. National Academy Press, Bethesda, MD) with its biggest cut awarded to animal experimentation. In their assessment of 92,922 NIH grant applications from 2000-2004, a scientific team under Theodore Kotchen of Medical College of Wisconsin cited higher scores for animal-based proposals than human-focused ones. Research of human derivation — i.e., clinical studies or use of human cell lines — is far less likely to get funding.

In Specious Science: Why Experiments on Animals Harm Humans, authors C. Ray Greek, MD and Jean Swingle Greek DVM claim "no one dares call attention" to this imbalance "for fear of retribution. From the standpoint of self-preservation, it’s far more prudent to remain silent." In terms of political-societal influence, medical science interests are analogous to the National Rifle Association and gun lobby.

Animal use in biomedical research is a multi-billion dollar business.
In 1999 mouse breeders netted over $200 million. Biological supplier Charles River Labs listed $140 million in profits. Genetically mutated mice go for $100-15,000 a piece (E. Pennisi, Science 288, 248). Among lab manufacturers, one sells a $70,200.00 Muromachi microwave fixation system for killing…

VIEW MOVIE ON YOUTUBE TO BOOST VISIBILITY: The Multi-Billion Dollar Lie

In 2009, USDA counted 1,131,076 animals used for research. USDA figures omit birds, rats, mice and farm animals in agricultural research. These animals are NOT protected under the Animal Welfare Act, though they comprise 90% of animals experimented upon. Some facilities underreport animals. Totals exclude animals used for breeding and conditioning. Independent studies estimate that 20-plus million animals are experimented upon each year. aphis.usda.gov/animal_welfare/efoia/7023.shtml ► all-creatures.org/saen/fact-anex-jun09.html

Animals are overdosed with toxins and addictive drugs…
Caught in a bureaucratic thicket, they endure electric shock, food-water deprivation, bone destruction, invasive surgeries, and intensive confinement for often immaterial studies. For example, Arizona State University cut funds for Michael Berens’ brain cancer experiments after 470 dog deaths and a 95% failure rate. Berens relocated so he could continue to inject cancer cells into beagle fetuses and replant tumors into puppy brains. Blind dogs suffer unremitting radiation and chemotherapy. "When it can’t take it anymore," Berens said, "a puppy is killed to move on to the next."

Carbon-copy experiments are routine. Over 60 NIH grants repeat drug addiction studies in primates; 70 grants finance eyesight tests in macaque monkeys; 170 projects assess neural data in macaque monkeys and 90 more rehash the same study in cats. Humans lose more than cash when they pay for futile and redundant science.

Behaviorist psychologist Dr. Roger E. Ulrich attests to the long history of animalto-human error: "We create false data which, combined with the differences among species, make our efforts to apply the results to man, useless."

Each species is so anatomically, physiologically, immunologically and genetically different from another, it’s impossible to reliably extrapolate animal data to humans. Mice produce about 100 times more cancer-fighting vitamin C than humans, an oversight that led Dr. Richard Klausner of the National Institute of Cancer to conclude: "We’ve cured mice of cancer for decades…and it simply didn’t work in humans."

Non-animal modes can now replace most animal experiments. But animals come cheap and old habits die hard.



spacer
spacerAction Alerts  ❘   Email List  ❘   Education Resources  ❘   Updates & Victories  ❘   News  ❘   About Us  ❘   Store  ❘   Home spacerDisaster Aid Home  ❘   Disaster Watch  ❘   Donate  ❘   Volunteer  ❘  Columns & Words  ❘   Videos  ❘   Heartbeats
Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Change.org Kinship Circle Store CafePress Store eBay Giving Works GoodSearch
spacer

KINSHIP CIRCLE
Animal Advocacy  ►  Education  ►  Disaster Aid

info@kinshipcircle.org  KinshipCircle.org  KinshipCircle.org/disasters
314-795-2646  |  7380 Kingsbury Blvd  |  Saint Louis, MO 63130 USA

PRIVACY POLICY